Home Wines Homemade Strawberry Rhubarb Wine Recipe

Homemade Strawberry Rhubarb Wine Recipe

by Sandra
Homemade Strawberry Rhubarb Wine Recipe

Wine making, traditionally seen as a craft reserved for grapes, has taken a whimsical turn in my kitchen. My latest adventure? Strawberry Rhubarb Wine. This blend is not just a drink; it’s a playful dance between sweet and tart, a liquid ode to summer’s bounty. For years, I’ve been a devout fan of the classic strawberry and rhubarb pie, a dessert that encapsulates the essence of warmth, family gatherings, and the joy of seasonal eating. During one such nostalgic indulgence, a thought struck me—why not capture this delightful harmony in a bottle?

How to make Strawberry Rhubarb Wine

Strawberry Rhubarb Wine is a type of wine made from fermenting strawberries and rhubarb together. It combines the fruity sweetness of strawberries with the tartness of rhubarb, resulting in a unique flavor profile that is both sweet and tangy.

Ingredients:

  • 2 lbs of fresh strawberries
  • 2 lbs of fresh rhubarb
  • 2.5 lbs of sugar (preferably white for a cleaner fermentation)
  • 1 gallon of water (preferably filtered or spring water)
  • 1 tsp of acid blend (to balance the wine’s pH)
  • 1 tsp of yeast nutrient (to support yeast health)
  • 1 package of wine yeast (Montrachet or any preferred wine yeast strain)
  • Campden tablets (optional for sterilization)
  • Pectic enzyme (helps break down the fruit’s pectin)

Instructions:

Preparation:

  1. Rinse the strawberries and rhubarb under cool water. Hull the strawberries and cut both the strawberries and rhubarb into small pieces.

Initial Fermentation:

  1. In a large pot, bring the water to a boil and dissolve the sugar in it. Let it cool down to room temperature.
  2. Place the cut strawberries and rhubarb in a fermentation bag inside a primary fermentation container (a food-grade bucket works well).
  3. Pour the cooled sugar water over the fruits, ensuring they’re fully submerged.
  4. Add the acid blend, yeast nutrient, and pectic enzyme according to the dosage recommended on their packages. If you’re using Campden tablets, crush and add one tablet, then let the mixture sit for 24 hours to sterilize.
  5. After 24 hours (or immediately if not using Campden tablets), sprinkle the wine yeast on top of the liquid without stirring.

Primary Fermentation Continues:

  1. Cover the fermentation container with a clean cloth or lid fitted with an airlock. Let it sit in a cool, dark place.
  2. Stir the mixture once daily, squeezing the fermentation bag gently to extract flavors for 5 to 7 days.

Secondary Fermentation:

  1. After the primary fermentation period, remove the fermentation bag, squeezing out any excess liquid back into the container.
  2. Transfer the liquid to a secondary fermentation vessel, like a glass carboy, using a siphon to avoid transferring sediment.
  3. Fit the carboy with an airlock and let the wine sit in a cool, dark place for about 4-6 weeks. This allows the wine to clear and mature.

Bottling:

  1. Once the wine has cleared and no more sediments form at the bottom, it’s ready to be bottled.
  2. Siphon the wine into clean bottles, leaving about an inch of headspace. Cork the bottles.

Aging:

  1. Store the bottles in a cool, dark place. The wine will continue to improve with age, and it’s generally best after 6 months to a year.

Tips for Success:

  • Sanitation is Key: Ensure all your equipment is thoroughly sanitized to prevent any unwanted bacteria from spoiling your wine.
  • Patience Pays Off: Resist the urge to rush the process. The longer your wine ages, the better the flavors will develop.
  • Taste Test: Feel free to taste your wine at different stages. This will not only be enjoyable but also give you insight into the fermentation process.

What to serve with

Strawberry Rhubarb Wine is a unique and flavorful beverage that pairs wonderfully with various dishes. Its balance of sweet and tart makes it versatile for different culinary settings, whether it’s a casual brunch or a refined dinner.

Appetizers:

  • Cheese Platters: Choose creamy and mild cheeses like Brie or Camembert, which complement the fruity notes of the wine without overpowering them. Add some goat cheese for a tangy contrast.
  • Fruit Skewers: Alternating pieces of melon, pineapple, and grapes on skewers can echo the fruit flavors in the Strawberry Rhubarb Wine.
  • Bruschetta: A simple tomato and basil bruschetta provides a fresh and light start that won’t compete with the wine’s flavor profile.

Main Courses:

  • Grilled Seafood: The acidity of the wine can beautifully cut through the richness of grilled salmon or shrimp. Season with lemon and herbs to echo the wine’s fresh notes.
  • Poultry: Dishes like a roasted chicken with a strawberry balsamic glaze can marry well with the berry notes in the wine.
  • Pork: Pork tenderloin with a rhubarb compote can create a delightful sweet and savory pairing that reflects the main elements of the wine.

Salads:

  • Spinach and Strawberry Salad: Combine fresh spinach, sliced strawberries, feta cheese, and a light vinaigrette for a salad that mirrors the flavors in your wine.
  • Arugula Salad: The peppery taste of arugula, mixed with goat cheese, nuts, and a simple lemon dressing, can complement the wine without overwhelming it.

Desserts:

  • Fruit Tarts: A fruit tart made with fresh strawberries or mixed berries can enhance the wine’s fruit-forward nuances.
  • Lemon Cheesecake: The citrusy tang of lemon cheesecake balances the sweet profile of the wine, creating a harmonious dessert pairing.
  • Vanilla Panna Cotta: A creamy vanilla panna cotta with a strawberry rhubarb compote on top can be a beautiful nod to the ingredients in the wine.

Snacks and Small Bites:

  • Dark Chocolate: A piece of dark chocolate can bring out the complexity of the wine and add a luxurious touch to the pairing.
  • Nuts: Almonds, cashews, or pecans can offer a satisfying crunch and a nutty flavor that complements the wine’s sweetness.

Ingredients Substitutes

Wine Recipe

Making Strawberry Rhubarb Wine can be a flexible process, and there may be occasions when you need to substitute key ingredients due to availability, taste preferences, or dietary restrictions. Below are detailed ingredient substitutes for making this wine:

Strawberries:

  • Berries: Raspberries, blackberries, or a berry blend can substitute for strawberries if they’re out of season or unavailable. These berries also offer a balance of sweet and tart tastes that complement rhubarb.
  • Cherries: Cherries can add a depth of flavor and a rich color to the wine, though they will result in a different flavor profile.

Rhubarb:

  • Green Apples: While not identical in taste, green apples can mimic the tartness of rhubarb and are often more readily available year-round.
  • Gooseberries: Gooseberries have a similar tartness to rhubarb and can work as a substitute, although they are less fibrous and may contribute to a slightly different texture.

Sugar:

  • Honey: You can replace sugar with honey for a more complex sweetness; however, you might need to adjust the amount slightly as honey is denser and sweeter than granulated sugar.
  • Agave Syrup: Agave syrup is another alternative, offering a similar level of sweetness. Use less agave syrup than sugar, as it tends to be sweeter.

Water:

  • Fruit Juice: To add more fruit character to your wine, use mild, non-citrus fruit juice such as white grape juice instead of water. This will also contribute additional natural sugars to the fermentation process.

Acid Blend:

  • Citric Acid: If you cannot find a commercial acid blend, you can use citric acid (sourced from citrus fruits) to adjust the wine’s acidity.
  • Tartaric Acid: Derived from grapes, tartaric acid is another component of many acid blends and can be used to create the desired pH balance.

Yeast Nutrient:

  • D.I.Y. Nutrient Blend: You can make your yeast nutrient by mixing baker’s yeast (boiled to deactivate it) with a small amount of Epsom salt and vitamin B complex.

Yeast:

  • Alternative Wine Yeast Strains: If you don’t have access to Montrachet yeast, consider using other wine yeast strains that work well with fruit wines, such as EC-1118 or Côte des Blancs.

Campden Tablets:

  • Potassium Metabisulfite: You can substitute Campden tablets with potassium metabisulfite powder to sterilize the must before adding yeast. Follow the instructions for proper amounts, as it is a potent chemical.

Pectic Enzyme:

  • None: If you cannot find a pectic enzyme, you may choose to go without it. However, this may result in a cloudier wine, as the enzyme helps clarify the wine by breaking down fruit pectin.

Final Thoughts

Creating Strawberry Rhubarb Wine is a delightful way to engage with the winemaking process and enjoy the fruits of your labor. Cheers to a successful batch of homemade wine filled with the essence of strawberries and rhubarb!

Homemade Strawberry Rhubarb Wine Recipe

Homemade Strawberry Rhubarb Wine

Serves: 4 Prep Time: Cooking Time:
Nutrition facts: 120 calories 0 gram fat
Rating: 5.0/5
( 1 voted )

Ingredients

  • 2 lbs of fresh strawberries
  • 2 lbs of fresh rhubarb
  • 2.5 lbs of sugar (preferably white for a cleaner fermentation)
  • 1 gallon of water (preferably filtered or spring water)
  • 1 tsp of acid blend (to balance the wine's pH)
  • 1 tsp of yeast nutrient (to support yeast health)
  • 1 package of wine yeast (Montrachet or any preferred wine yeast strain)
  • Campden tablets (optional for sterilization)
  • Pectic enzyme (helps break down the fruit's pectin)

Instructions

Preparation:

  1. Rinse the strawberries and rhubarb under cool water. Hull the strawberries and cut both the strawberries and rhubarb into small pieces.

Initial Fermentation:

  1. In a large pot, bring the water to a boil and dissolve the sugar in it. Let it cool down to room temperature.
  2. Place the cut strawberries and rhubarb in a fermentation bag inside a primary fermentation container (a food-grade bucket works well).
  3. Pour the cooled sugar water over the fruits, ensuring they're fully submerged.
  4. Add the acid blend, yeast nutrient, and pectic enzyme according to the dosage recommended on their packages. If you're using Campden tablets, crush and add one tablet, then let the mixture sit for 24 hours to sterilize.
  5. After 24 hours (or immediately if not using Campden tablets), sprinkle the wine yeast on top of the liquid without stirring.

Primary Fermentation Continues:

  1. Cover the fermentation container with a clean cloth or lid fitted with an airlock. Let it sit in a cool, dark place.
  2. Stir the mixture once daily, squeezing the fermentation bag gently to extract flavors for 5 to 7 days.

Secondary Fermentation:

  1. After the primary fermentation period, remove the fermentation bag, squeezing out any excess liquid back into the container.
  2. Transfer the liquid to a secondary fermentation vessel, like a glass carboy, using a siphon to avoid transferring sediment.
  3. Fit the carboy with an airlock and let the wine sit in a cool, dark place for about 4-6 weeks. This allows the wine to clear and mature.

Bottling:

  1. Once the wine has cleared and no more sediments form at the bottom, it's ready to be bottled.
  2. Siphon the wine into clean bottles, leaving about an inch of headspace. Cork the bottles.

Aging:

  1. Store the bottles in a cool, dark place. The wine will continue to improve with age, and it's generally best after 6 months to a year.

Leave a Comment

This website uses cookies to improve your experience. We'll assume you're ok with this, but you can opt-out if you wish. Accept Read More